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Anonymous said: I didn't see how to reply so I started a new entry: Anonymous said: If we add a water dispenser for our customers to get a glass of water, do we also need a drain pipe or just a splash plate to catch drips? -thanks. ANSWER: Likely not, but I need a little more information. Is this a 5 gallon portable water dispenser or something plumbed in? Let me know! REPLY: It would be a plumbed in line with a water filter, then coming out of a spout with a shut off lever.

Hello, if it is directly plumbed you need a plumbed in drain as well.

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Anonymous said: Are tarps required on the ground at temporary events?

Hi,

If you are on grass or dirt, yes tarps are required. If you are on asphalt or concrete they are not required. This photo is from a waterfront event where they laid down plywood.

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Notice red tongs are being used to handle beef only.

Notice red tongs are being used to handle beef only.

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Food Security - Feeding the World with Aquaculture (Fish Farming)

I imagine that most of us wake up the morning to an alarm and hit the snooze button a few times knowing we have a few minutes to spare before we jump into action. Things are not much different with the situation in our global food production. The alarm is going off, but I am not sure how many times we can continue to hit the snooze button without serious consequences to our planet and people.

The focus of this column ‘Food Security’ has been on the general state of our increasing population and some of the most pressing or interesting  issues as we try to figure out the best way to produce more food safely while protecting our health and the planet’s resources for future generations.

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Workers harvest catfish from the Delta Pride Catfish farms in Mississippi.

Each American eats about 15 pounds of seafood a year, but do you know where it comes from? The United States imports 91% of its seafood, about half of which is from aquaculture (fish farming). Most aquaculture imports are shrimp, followed by Atlantic salmon, Tilapia, and shellfish (Fishwatch, 2014).

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It’s Small Fly Season - Prevention is the Key to a Pest Free Environment

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Common fruit fly

Humans and flies have been interacting with each other since the beginning of time; like peanut butter and jelly, pizza and beer, Bonnie and Clyde.  As with all living things, flies do have their purpose in our ecosystem, yet are unwelcome guests in our kitchens.  Flies carry and transmit disease. They vomit digestive enzymes on food and lay their eggs in our ripening fruit.

These small flies, Fruit Flies and Phorid Flies, seem to mysteriously materialize in large swarming groups throughout a facility, usually when the weather is warming up.  These small flies are commonly found where there is exposed fruit or vegetables, in garbage and composting areas, and in the bar. I still find them in one facility drawn to sealed bottles of Worcestershire sauce in a store room.

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Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point #6 - Custom Processing of Animals

Matt Hoffman, Health Educator, MPH

Portland and many other areas are in the midst of a farm-to-fork revival, where local and sustainably raised meats reign supreme. Occasionally our inspectors are asked whether it is allowable for individuals to custom process animals in a licensed restaurant kitchen. Let’s tackle that question in this month’s HACCP series.

Custom processing of animals refers to the receipt and processing of any domestic game animal or other animal (excluding seafood) that has not been slaughtered and processed in a US Department of Agriculture (or equivalent) inspected and licensed facility. image

Peasants slaughtering a pig, by Flemish artist Pieter Bruegel

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Anonymous said: Hello. I'm curious about the health code rules regarding the making of Kimchee. Can an establishment make and ferment kimchee without refrigerating it, as it's meant to be made? Thanks.

Kim chee made using raw sliced cabbage and fermented naturally without a heat treatment step should be considered a non-potentially hazardous food. While sliced cabbage is technically considered a cut leafy green subject to the temperature control requirements in the rules, natural fermentation is a very low risk process. In addition, at the present time, Oregon Department of Agriculture considers this process acceptable without temperature control and we are approaching this issue in the same way.