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Anonymous said: first question in a haccp flow chart

The first step is to conduct a hazard analysis. Check out this article on the blog.

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Food Security - Our Sacred Beef

By Elizabeth Sandberg, REHS, MS

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Photo by Japanexperterna (CC BY-SA) (where “Japanexperterna is a link leading to www.japanexperterna,se)

The beef is still sacred to some. We have local farmers and ranchers right here in Oregon upholding the standards for raising beef naturally, from birth to market, with environmental awareness of their impact on the land. This month’s Food Security column will do an overview on the business of beef and if we are getting the best bang for our buck on this protein source.

In 2050 our planet’s population will reach nine billion and it is estimated that we need to increase our food production by 70%. I wanted to look at the beef industry facts and see if this seems like a smart choice in evaluating the impact of our current methods of beef production on our environment, our health and examine what natural resources we use in CAFOs (confined animal feeding operations).

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Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point #7 - Pickling

If you’re attuned to the food scene in Portland, you well know that there’s been a pickling craze happening around town for a while now. Drop some cucumbers in water, add vinegar, salt and spices, and voila! Pickles. A certain television show that parodies Portlanders suggests that we can pickle anything, from ice cream cones to parking tickets. While most of our operators won’t likely be engaging in those types, we do see pickling of vegetables and many other foods. Under current Oregon Food Sanitation Rules, we call this process acidification. Regardless of what you intend to pickle (acidify), here’s what you need to know from the perspective of the Health Department.

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Fresh cucumbers with a vinegar brine and fresh dill.

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Chase meaning rather than avoid discomfort.
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Check out rock-star Inspector Michael McLuckie in this video about the Health Department’s work to ensure food safety.

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Anonymous said: I didn't see how to reply so I started a new entry: Anonymous said: If we add a water dispenser for our customers to get a glass of water, do we also need a drain pipe or just a splash plate to catch drips? -thanks. ANSWER: Likely not, but I need a little more information. Is this a 5 gallon portable water dispenser or something plumbed in? Let me know! REPLY: It would be a plumbed in line with a water filter, then coming out of a spout with a shut off lever.

Hello, if it is directly plumbed you need a plumbed in drain as well.

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Food Security - Feeding the World with Aquaculture (Fish Farming)

I imagine that most of us wake up the morning to an alarm and hit the snooze button a few times knowing we have a few minutes to spare before we jump into action. Things are not much different with the situation in our global food production. The alarm is going off, but I am not sure how many times we can continue to hit the snooze button without serious consequences to our planet and people.

The focus of this column ‘Food Security’ has been on the general state of our increasing population and some of the most pressing or interesting  issues as we try to figure out the best way to produce more food safely while protecting our health and the planet’s resources for future generations.

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Workers harvest catfish from the Delta Pride Catfish farms in Mississippi.

Each American eats about 15 pounds of seafood a year, but do you know where it comes from? The United States imports 91% of its seafood, about half of which is from aquaculture (fish farming). Most aquaculture imports are shrimp, followed by Atlantic salmon, Tilapia, and shellfish (Fishwatch, 2014).

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